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Posts Tagged ‘drake dunsmore’

Labor Day Shake-Ups

September 04, 2012 at 10:36am by Scott   •  2 Comments »

roster2

I guess the Bucs didn’t get the message that this was Labor Day weekend and that it was perfectly acceptable — nay, expected — that we lay in bed all day scratching ourselves and then go to some public park where they’re having a barbecue and blend in with the crowd and mooch food. But no, they decided to use the weekend to get better, which is fine in the long run but makes me look like a slacker.

There was some shuffling around (including Wallace Gilberry getting cut and re-signed along with other guys you’ve never heard of getting signed and then cut again), but basically it nets out to them bringing in C/G Cody Wallace, DT Corvey Irvin and RB D.J. Ware while losing T Bradley Sowell and CB Brandon McDonald (remember, they had 52 to start). Irvin is a third year player out of Georgia who spent time at Carolina and Jacksonville and Wallace is a fourth year player out of Texas A&M. Neither of them have as much experience as their years would indicate since they’ve barely ever been on an active roster. But they’re both positions of need so you just have to bring them on and hope you never have to find out what they can actually do.

Ware is an interesting case because it’s not like the Bucs needed another running back. But Ware was part of a winning program in New York and Mike Sullivan is familiar with his work. I know Ware from his time at Georgia and remember him as a guy who is capable of breaking big runs from time to time, but is more of a grinder. Maybe a third and short back. He may have been brought in to keep LeGarrette Blount from getting complacent. Seems like that roster spot could have been used more wisely, but he must bring something to the team that doesn’t appear in his stats.

The Bucs also built a practice squad out of Drake Dunsmore, Jacob Cutrera and Sowell along with two WRs, two more LBs and a QB.

That’s how it stands right now. I like the starters and I like the depth on the back seven of the defense. But as we all know, games are won and lost in the trenches and the depth there is still suspect. I did finally watch that fourth preseason game and I saw how the backups performed. They made Jonathan Crompton look good and gave Brett Ratliff PTSD. But the Bucs have undoubtedly scoured the waiver wire and this is who they think are the best fits to serve their needs, so there you go.

(D.J. Ware is a better fit than Tiquan Underwood on a team with only five wide receivers? How does that work?)

REAR ENTRIES: Everyday I’m Shuffling

May 08, 2012 at 11:04am by Scott   •  9 Comments »

Rear Entry 124

LET THE SIGNINGS BEGIN: The Bucs signed their two seventh-round picks yesterday, RB Michael Smith and TE Drake Dunsmore. Details of the contracts weren’t revealed, so I guess they only do that when they’re showing off.

The 6-3, 235-pound Dunsmore played a position called “superback” in Northwestern’s prolific offense in 2011 and scouts believe he could line up anywhere from tight end to fullback to H-back.

Seriously, “Superback”? And remember Cody Grimm was the “Deathbacker“. Do they do that in other industries, too? Does the best dishwasher get called the Dishcrusher or the Soap Soldier or something?

BUCS SIGN JILTED PATRIOT: The Bucs picked up Tiquan Underwood yesterday, the former New England Patriot who was cut the day before the Super Bowl.

Underwood was released by the Patriots in February, on the eve of Super Bowl XLVI, so the team could promote defensive tackle Alex Silvestro from the practice squad. He re-signed three days later but was cut again May 3 so the Pats could sign former Florida receiver Jabar Gaffney.

Even John McCargo thinks this guy got fucked.

The addition of Underwood puts the total number of former Rutgers players on the roster at seven. There has been some bitching that Greg Schiano is playing favorites with his former guys, but he knows these players and what they’re capable of. He’s not going to jeopardize winning just to give a couple guys who used to play for him a temporary paycheck. Schiano has made it clear that no one is going to be given preferential treatment and that he will do what’s best for the Bucs, so he needs to be given the benefit of the doubt at this point.

ROSTER CHANGES: The bugs did a lot of roster shuffling over the last couple days. Here’s most of it:

Here is the list of tryout players signed from the rookie minicamp:

Wagner DE Quintin Anderson
Ball State S Sean Baker
Arkansas RB De’Anthony Curtis
Iowa P Eric Guthrie
Nebraska T Jermarcus Hardrick
LSU QB Jordan Jefferson
Henderson State FB Antonio Leak
North Carolina DT Jordan Nix
Toledo TE Danny Noble
Connecticut C Moe Petrus
Portland State DT Myles Wade

The players released include:

WR Luther Ambrose
LB Ryan Baker
LB Mike Balogun
QB Zach Collaros
S Ron Girault Rugters
C Chaz Hine
DT Donte’e Nicholls
T Trevor Olson
G Chris Riley
K Jake Rogers
CB Quenton Washington
T Rocky Weaver

De’Anthony Curtis and Jordan Nix are both interesting prospects. All the others I’m pretty sure are made up names.

Draft Wrap Up

April 30, 2012 at 10:42am by Scott   •  9 Comments »

2012 Draft Roundip

With the Bucs having traded away their second-round pick in order to move back into the first to take Doug Martin, most people thought Mark Dominik would stand pat and wait for his third-rounder to hit. But Dominik is a sniper who sees what he wants and just fucking takes it. And what he wanted was LB Lavonte David out of Nebraska and he didn’t think think David was going to be there in the third for him. Someone in the chat on Friday called David as the next pick. I forget who it was, but bully for him. Nice call.

David is 6-0, 233 and runs a 4.65 40. Most people would call him undersized for a linebacker, but that would be his only drawback. He was super-productive at Nebraska and made all-conference after transferring from a junior college. He’s smart, athletic and closes on the football quick. It’s going to be tempting to compare him to Derrick Brooks because he’ll probably play the same position and because Brooks had the same “undersized” knock against him when he was drafted. This kid obviously has a long way to go, but just keep it in the back of your mind. This is why the Bucs felt comfortable passing on a linebacker in the first round. Dominik knew David was going to be there in the second and that freed him up to do what he did in the first.

I feel the need to point this out since there was so much Dominik bashing on Friday. Dominik traded down two spots to #7 and picked up a fourth-rounder, a price most people said was too low. Dominik took that fourth-rounder and used it to trade back up in the first to grab Martin. But all he did was swap fourths to do it. He still had a fourth-rounder going into the second. He then took that fourth to trade back into the second round for David. He used one fourth-rounder to trade up twice. That’s some expert wheeling and dealing, and if you don’t think so you’re just hater who enjoys being miserable and should pick another team to root for or bitch about as you please. But leave my Bucs out of your sphere of depression.

The rest of the draft I found underwhelming, mostly because I didn’t know any of the players. The Bucs took LB Najee Goode in the fifth and CB Keith Tandy, both from West Virginia. In fact, Goode and Tandy were roommates in college, so they should give the second-team back seven some continuity walking into camp. Greg Schiano played both these guys several times while at Rutgers (both WV and Rutgers are in the Big East), so he obviously spent some time scouting them even before he got to the Bucs.

“Obviously, I know a lot about both the West Virginia kids playing against them for four years,” former Rutgers coach Schiano said. “They were both a royal pain in the rear. As I told them, it’s good to be on the same side now.

“Those two guys are football maniacs. I mean, they love the game, and they play it with such passion.”

With his first seventh-round pick, Dominik grabbed Michael Smith, a running back from Utah State. Smith’s pick is all about speed and he is a true change-of-pace back. In fact, another team liked him so much that they offered Dominik a sixth-rounder next year for Smith right after he was drafted.

“I never had that happen before,” Dominik said.

Smith claimed to run a 4.26 at some point, but he was clocked at 4.32 at his pro day. That probably translates a few hundredths higher at the combine, but is still faster than anyone the Bucs currently have. Smith is 5-9, 207 and had a recent groin injury, so there’s going to be some talk about his size and durability, but for a seventh-rounder, he sounds like a steal. So I won’t hold it against Dominik for not drafting Tauren Poole out of Tennessee with this pick. Poole, by the way, went to Carolina on a UFA deal, so we’ll be seeing him soon enough.

The Bucs’ last pick was Drake Dunsmore, a tight end out of Northwestern who probably projects as a fullback. Erik Lorig and Luke Stocker already have the jobs of “white guys who can block” filled, so I’m going to say Dunsmore doesn’t make the team. Everyone else, though, I think has a real shot of sticking.

With nearly 48 hours passing since the draft ended, it seems like a good time to look at draft grades. Of course that’s dumb, but people do it anyway. SI gives the Bucs an A-, Ira Kaufman gives them a B+, Mel Kiper gave them something good (I’ll never know because I won’t pay for it, but the Bucs did well enough to be the team they push on the home page), and CBS gives them a solid B. All the draft reviews have the same complaint, though: that the Bucs should have just taken Morris Claiborne. But without the trade down, the trades back up don’t happen. Barron is a solid player at a position of huge need for the team. And again, if the Bucs thought Claiborne was better than Mark Barron, they would have taken him. But the Bucs were in a unique position to know a lot about Claiborne and they went ahead and picked Barron anyway. That’s the last time I’ll beat that horse, but it seems so obvious that I don’t know why more people aren’t realizing it.